In the vale a train is taking the curve,
metal wheels sharpening metal rails,
a speed-camera flash. It’s dusk.

It hoots, bright, and then it is
a grinding noise in the distance. Then gone.
The stars come out again. A frog moves.

The horse is poured moonlight;
assembled curves like an Arab alphabet
cantering through its dark green medium.

--

--

The doves of sobriety chide
Shaking and cooing in fear
As the hawk in the bright sky glides
Nearer, nearer and near —
He gyres his way in the sun
He tosses his shadow beneath
But his prey only coo and thrum
Hiding in branch and leaf.

‘He is coming, we cannot evade!’
Says Fear, passing bird unto bird
‘He is swift and shaped as a blade
To plunder and sunder in blood.
We are doomed, we are doomed,’ they call
But still they do not fly away.
And this is the fate of us all.
And that is the most we can say.

--

--

Giovanni Baglione’s ‘The Divine Eros Defeats the Earthly Eros’ (1602)

“Possibilities are projected onto a screen of what is actual and present by means of the poet’s tactic … That godlike self, never known before, comes into focus and vanishes again in one quick shift of view. As the planes of vision jump, the actual self and the ideal self and the difference between them connect in one triangle momentarily. The connection is eros.” Anne Carson

“Eros and Thanatos are not two opposite drives that compete and combine (as in eroticized masochism); there is only one drive, libido, striving for enjoyment, and ‘death drive’ is the curved space of its formal structure.” Slavoj Žižek

--

--